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Rape Is A Form of Sexual Assaut

Rape is a type of sexual assault usually involving sexual intercourse or other forms of sexual penetration perpetrated against a person without that person’s consent.

  • 17.7 million women in the U.S. have been victims of rape
  • 2.78 million men in the U.S. have been victims of rape
  • 15% of sexual assault and rape victims are under 12 years old

Reactions

Rape can happen to anyone. No two survivors react to sexual assault in exactly the same way. Whatever you feel is normal and feelings can include anger, frustration, fear, shame, guilt or numbness. Even the most well-meaning, supportive family and friends may not understand the situation or how you feel right away.

Remember, if you are alive, you did something right!

Being asked to make important medical and legal decisions only a short time after the crime may intensify these feelings.

Medical Attention

Whether or not you wish to report the crime to the police, it is very important that you seek medical attention immediately. Sexual assault survivors can have internal injuries which may not be visible or painful for some time.

Medical Examination

Depending on the type of attack you experience, a pelvic examination may be necessary to check for injury and to confirm penetration. This exam is held in a private room in the Emergency Department of the Governor Juan Luis Hospital.

A medical examination at the hospital is performed by a doctor. As an extended part of the medical examination, an Evidence Collection Kit will be used to make sure that the evidence needed to build a strong court case is found and preserved in the correct way.

You will be allowed to have a relative or an Advocate with you during the examination, as long as she/he does not interfere with medical procedures.

WCSC has advocates on duty every day of the year to offer you support at the hospital or police station. Call our 24-hour hotline, (340)773-9272, to speak with an advocate.

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Additional or Follow-up Medical Attention

You will need to visit a private doctor or health clinic for follow-up medical care and testing. Neither pregnancy nor sexually transmitted disease resulting from the assault will be detectable at the time of your first medical examination.

Follow-up examinations are essential to insure adequate treatment. Many women have no symptoms when they develop an infection. This can lead to serious complications if left untreated.

Follow-Up Contacts

Please call the hospital for more information: Main number: 778-6311, extensions 2663, 2664 or 2665, to reach the emergency room staff.

Police Interview–A Detailed Account

At some time before or after the physical examination, a police detective will ask you to give a detailed account of the assault – which she/he will write down. The interview is an important step in the investigation of sexual assault cases, because the victim is usually the only witness to the crime.

If you wish, the WCSC volunteer advocate may accompany you during this interview.

 

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The Women's Coalition of St. Croix
P.O. Box 222734
Christiansted, VI 00822-2734

Telephone: (340) 773-9272
Facsimile: (340) 773-9062

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